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Indiaball, officially the Republic of Indiaball (Bhārat Gaṇarājyabola), is a countryball living in South Asia. He has the seventh-largest clay by area, and he is the largest democracy in the world. He also has a very long history. He is the fastest growing economy in the world, growing very fast in GDP and military at 7.3%.He is also the 3rd richest countryball.

The Indian subcontinent , where Indiaball lives was identified with its commercial and cultural wealth for much of its long history. Four world religions: HinduismBuddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism — originated there. Others religions like Judaism mixed into the society without facing antisemitism.

Indiaball is also a member of the G20 (or Group of Twenty), a group formed by the countryballs that have the 19 largest economies plus the EUball. Apart from this India is part of BRICSbrick.

Indiaball is very young given his huge young population and being only 59.5 years old (as of 11/2016). His birthday (national day) is in August 15. His astrological sign is Leo.

History Edit

(From Wiki) Indiaball's Origins go back to BCE 5500, Almost 8,000 years old. Indiaball has been ruled by the Mauryaball, Vedicball, Mughalball and other princely stateballs for thousands of years. Indiaball under Vedicball extended Vedic Hindu and Buddhist rule from Iran to Indonesia. They started out from living in the Indus Valley, but gradually expanded their clay to include all of the Indian Subcontinent, South East Asia and Tibet by 0 AD. This period of time saw Macedon-icon Macedonball (not fake Macedonia-icon FYROMball) visit in 332 BC and also Mongolia-icon Mongoliaball's father Mongolball attempt to invade in the 1200s.

Prehistoric TimesEdit

  • Early Neolithic culture with first confirmed semi permanent settlements appeared 11000 years ago in the Bhimbetka rock shelters in modern Madhya Pradesh, India. Some of the Stone Age rock paintings found among the Bhimbetka rock shelters are approximately 30,000 years old.[15]

The ancient history of the region includes some of South Asia's oldest settlements[16] and some of its major civilisations.[17][18]

  • 2600BCE: The cities of Harappa and Mohenjo-daro become large metropolises and the civilization expands to over 2,500 cities and settlements across the whole of Pakistan, much of northern India, and large parts of Afghanistan,[19] covering a region of around one million square miles, which was larger than the land area of its contemporaries Egypt and Mesopotamia combined, and also had superior urban planning and sewage systems. The civilization began using the mature Indus script for its writing system.

Indus Valley CivilizationEdit

The Indus Valley Civilisation (IVC) was a Bronze Age civilisation (3300–1300 BCE; mature period 2600–1600 BCE) mainly in the northwestern regions of the South Asia, extending from what today is northeast Afghanistan to Pakistan and northwest India.[2] Along with ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia it was one of three early civilisations of the Old World, and of the three, the most widespread.[3][note 1] It flourished in the basins of the Indus River, which flows through the length of Pakistan, and along a system of perennial, mostly monsoon-fed, rivers that once coursed in the vicinity of the seasonal Ghaggar-Hakra river in northwest India and eastern Pakistan.[4][5][6][note 2] Aridification of this region during the 3rd millennium BCE may have been the initial spur for the urbanisation associated with the civilisation, but eventually also reduced the water supply enough to cause the civilisation's demise, and to scatter its population eastward.

At its peak, the Indus Civilisation may have had a population of over five million.[10] Inhabitants of the ancient Indus river valley developed new techniques in handicraft (carnelian products, seal carving) and metallurgy (copper, bronze, lead, and tin). The Indus cities are noted for their urban planning, baked brick houses, elaborate drainage systems, water supply systems, and clusters of large non-residential buildings.[11]

The Indus Valley Civilisation is also known as the Harappan Civilisation, after Harappa, the first of its sites to be excavated in the 1920s, in what was then the Punjab province of British India, and now is Pakistan.[12] The discovery of Harappa, and soon afterwards, Mohenjo-Daro, was the culmination of work beginning in 1861 with the founding of the Archaeological Survey of India in the British Raj.[13] Excavation of Harappan sites has been ongoing since 1920, with important breakthroughs occurring as recently as 1999.[14] There were earlier and later cultures, often called Early Harappan and Late Harappan, in the same area as the Mature Harappan Civilisation. The Harappan civilisation is sometimes called the Mature Harappan' culture to distinguish it from these cultures. The early Harappan cultures were preceded by local Neolithic agricultural villages, from where the river plains were populated.[15][16] As of 1999, over 1,056 cities and settlements had been found, of which 96 have been excavated,[17] mainly in the general region of the Indus and Ghaggar-Hakra Rivers and their tributaries. Among the settlements were the major urban centres of Harappa, Mohenjo-daro (UNESCO World Heritage Site), Dholavira, Ganeriwala in Cholistan and Rakhigarhi.[18]

The Harappan language is not directly attested and its affiliation is uncertain since the Indus script is still undeciphered. A relationship with the Dravidian or Elamo-Dravidian language family is favoured by a section of scholars.[19][20]

Vedic AgeEdit

The Vedic period (or Vedic age) (c. 1500 – c. 500 BCE) was the period in Indian history during which the Vedas, the oldest scriptures of Hinduism, were composed.[note 1]

During the early part of the Vedic period, the Indo-Aryans settled into northern India, bringing with them their specific religious traditions. The associated culture (sometimes referred to as Vedic civilisation[note 2]) was initially a tribal, pastoral society centred in the northwestern parts of the Indian subcontinent; it spread after 1200 BCE to the Ganges Plain, as it was shaped by increasing settled agriculture, a hierarchy of four social classes, and the emergence of monarchical, state-level polities.[3][4] Scholars consider Vedic civilisation to have been a composite of the Indo-Aryan and Harappan cultures.[5]

The end of the Vedic period witnessed the rise of large, urbanised states as well as of shramana movements (including Jainism and Buddhism) which challenged the Vedic orthodoxy.[6] Around the beginning of the Common Era, the Vedic tradition formed one of the main constituents of the so-called "Hindu synthesis".[7]

Age of EmpiresEdit

  • The Maurya Empire was a geographically extensive Iron Age historical power founded by Chandragupta Maurya which dominated ancient India between c. 322 and 185 BCE. Originating from the kingdom of Magadha in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in the eastern side of the Indian subcontinent, the empire had its capital city at Pataliputra (modern Patna).[2][3] The empire was the largest to have ever existed in the Indian subcontinent, spanning over 5 million square kilometres at its zenith under Ashoka.

Chandragupta Maurya, raised an army and with the assistance of Chanakya, overthrew the Nanda Empire in c. 322 BCE and rapidly expanded his power westwards across central and western India taking advantage of the disruptions caused by the withdrawal westward by Alexander the Great's armies. By 316 BCE the empire had fully occupied Northwestern India, defeating and conquering the satraps left by Alexander.[4][unreliable source?] Chandragupta then defeated the invasion led by Seleucus I, a Macedonian general from Alexander's army, gaining additional territory west of the Indus River.[5]

The Maurya Empire was one of the largest empires of the world in its time. At its greatest extent, the empire stretched to the north along the natural boundaries of the Himalayas, to the east into Assam, to the west into Balochistan (south west Pakistan and south east Iran) and the Hindu Kush mountains of what is now Afghanistan.[6] The Empire was expanded into India's central and southern regions[7][8] by the emperors Chandragupta and Bindusara, but it excluded a small portion of unexplored tribal and forested regions near Kalinga (modern Odisha), until it was conquered by Ashoka.[9] It declined for about 50 years after Ashoka's rule ended, and it dissolved in 185 BCE with the foundation of the Shunga dynasty in Magadha.

Under Chandragupta and his successors, internal and external trade, agriculture and economic activities, all thrived and expanded across India thanks to the creation of a single and efficient system of finance, administration, and security. After the Kalinga War, the Empire experienced nearly half a century of peace and security under Ashoka. Mauryan India also enjoyed an era of social harmony, religious transformation, and expansion of the sciences and of knowledge. Chandragupta Maurya's embrace of Jainism increased social and religious renewal and reform across his society, while Ashoka's embrace of Buddhism has been said to have been the foundation of the reign of social and political peace and non-violence across all of India. Ashoka sponsored the spreading of Buddhist ideals into Sri Lanka, Southeast Asia, West Asia[10][unreliable source?] and Mediterranean Europe.[4][unreliable source?]

The population of the empire has been estimated to be about 50–60 million, making the Mauryan Empire one of the most populous empires of Antiquity.[11][12] Archaeologically, the period of Mauryan rule in South Asia falls into the era of Northern Black Polished Ware (NBPW). The Arthashastra[13] and the Edicts of Ashoka are the primary sources of written records of Mauryan times. The Lion Capital of Ashoka at Sarnath has been made the national emblem of India.

  • The Gupta Empire was founded by Sri Gupta, which existed at its zenith from approximately 320 to 550 CE and covered much of the Indian subcontinent.[1] The peace and prosperity created under the leadership of the Guptas enabled the pursuit of scientific and artistic endeavors.[2][unreliable source?] This period is called the Golden Age of India[3] and was marked by extensive inventions and discoveries in science, technology, engineering, art, dialectic, literature, logic, mathematics, astronomy, religion, and philosophy that crystallized the elements of what is generally known as Hindu culture.[4][unreliable source?] Chandragupta I, Samudragupta, and Chandragupta II were the most notable rulers of the Gupta dynasty. The 4th century CE Sanskrit poet Kalidasa credits the Guptas with having conquered about twenty-one kingdoms, both in and outside India, including the kingdoms of Parasikas, the Hunas, the Kambojas, tribes located in the west and east Oxus valleys, the Kinnaras, Kiratas etc.[5][non-primary source needed]

The high points of this cultural creativity are magnificent architecture, sculptures and paintings.[6] The Gupta period produced scholars such as Kalidasa, Aryabhata, Varahamihira, Vishnu Sharma and Vatsyayana who made great advancements in many academic fields.[7][unreliable source?][8] Science and political administration reached new heights during the Gupta era. Strong trade ties also made the region an important cultural center and set the region up as a base that would influence nearby kingdoms and regions in Burma, Sri Lanka, and Southeast Asia.[9][unreliable source?] The earliest available Indian epics are also thought to have been committed to written texts around this period.

The empire gradually declined because of many factors such as substantial loss of territory and imperial authority caused by their own erstwhile feudatories and the invasion by the Huna peoples (Ephthalite Huns) from Central Asia.[10][11] After the collapse of the Gupta Empire in the 6th century, India was again ruled by numerous regional kingdoms. A minor line of the Gupta clan continued to rule Magadha after the disintegration of the empire. These Guptas were ultimately ousted by Vardhana ruler Harsha, who established his empire in the first half of the 7th century.[citation needed]

  • The Chola dynasty was one of the longest-ruling dynasties in the history of southern India. The earliest datable references to this Tamil dynasty are in inscriptions from the 3rd century BCE left by Ashoka, of the Maurya Empire. As one of the Three Crowned Kings of Tamilakam, the dynasty continued to govern over varying territory until the 13th century CE.

The heartland of the Cholas was the fertile valley of the Kaveri River, but they ruled a significantly larger area at the height of their power from the later half of the 9th century till the beginning of the 13th century. The whole country south of the Tungabhadra was united and held as one state for a period of two centuries and more.[2] Under Rajaraja Chola I and his successors Rajendra Chola I, Rajadhiraja Chola, Virarajendra Chola and Kulothunga Chola I the dynasty became a military, economic and cultural power in South Asia and South-East Asia.[3] The power of the new empire was proclaimed to the eastern world by the expedition to the Ganges which Rajendra Chola I undertook and by the naval raids on cities of the maritime empire of Srivijaya, as well as by the repeated embassies to China.[4] The Chola fleet represented the zenith of ancient Indian sea power.

During the period 1010–1200, the Chola territories stretched from the islands of the Maldives in the south to as far north as the banks of the Godavari River in Andhra Pradesh.[5] Rajaraja Chola conquered peninsular South India, annexed parts of which is now Sri Lanka and occupied the islands of the Maldives. Rajendra Chola sent a victorious expedition to North India that touched the river Ganges and defeated the Pala ruler of Pataliputra, Mahipala. He also successfully invaded cities of Srivijaya of Malaysia and Indonesia.[6] The Chola dynasty went into decline at the beginning of the 13th century with the rise of the Pandyan Dynasty, which ultimately caused their downfall.[7][8]

The Cholas left a lasting legacy. Their patronage of Tamil literature and their zeal in the building of temples has resulted in some great works of Tamil literature and architecture.[3] The Chola kings were avid builders and envisioned the temples in their kingdoms not only as places of worship but also as centres of economic activity.[9][10] They pioneered a centralised form of government and established a disciplined bureaucracy. The Chola school of art spread to Southeast Asia and influenced the architecture and art of Southeast Asia.[11][12]

Kebab Conquest of HindustanEdit

The Kebab conquest of Hindustan refers to the invasion of Indian subcontinent by the Arabs and Turks. Indiaball hates the kebab for raping it viciously and looting the enormous wealth it had. Though Indiaball is to blame for its rape as it was too busy watching kingdomball wrestling and couldn't selected an emperor. Because unified, India was invincible, and MAURYAN EMPIRE WAS OF STRONKEST and ASHOK WAS OF THE STRONKEST EMPEROR! Kebab conquests on the Indian subcontinent mainly took place from the 12th to the 16th centuries, though earlier conquests made limited inroads into modern Afghanistan and Pakistan as early as the time of the Rajput kingdoms in the 8th century. With the establishment of the Delhi Sultanate, Islam spread across large parts of the subcontinent. In 1204, Bakhtiar Khilji led the Muslim conquest of Bengal, marking the eastern-most expansion of Islam at the time.

Prior to the rise of the Maratha Empire, which was followed by the conquest of India by the British East India Company, the Mughal Empire was able to annex or subjugate most of India's kings. However, it was never able to conquer the kingdoms in upper reaches of the Himalayas such as the regions of today's Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Sikkim, Nepal and Bhutan; the extreme south of India, such as Travancore and Tamil Nadu; and in the east, such as the Ahom kingdom in Assam.

Mughal EraEdit

The Mughal empire extended over large parts of the Indian subcontinent and Afghanistan. The empire at its peak, was the second largest to have existed in the Indian subcontinent, spanning 4 million square kilometres at its zenith, after the Maurya Empire, which spanned 5 million square kilometres.

The beginning of the empire is conventionally dated to the victory by its founder Babur over Ibrahim Lodi, the last ruler of the Delhi Sultanate, in the First Battle of Panipat (1526). The Mughal emperors were Central Asian Turco-Mongols belonging to the Timurid dynasty, who claimed direct descent from both Genghis Khan (founder of the Mongol Empire, through his son Chagatai Khan) and Timur (Turco-Mongol conqueror who founded the Timurid Empire). During the reign of Humayun, the successor of Babur, the empire was briefly interrupted by the Sur Empire. The "classic period" of the Mughal Empire started in 1556 with the ascension of Akbar the Great to the throne. Under the rule of Akbar and his son Jahangir, the region enjoyed economic progress as well as religious harmony, and the monarchs were interested in local religious and cultural traditions. Akbar was a successful warrior who also forged alliances with several Hindu Rajput kingdoms. Some Rajput kingdoms continued to pose a significant threat to the Mughal dominance of northwestern India, but most of them were subdued by Akbar. All Mughal emperors were Muslims; while Akbar was Muslim most of his life, he propounded a syncretic religion in the latter part of his life called Deen-i-Ilahi, as recorded in historical books like Ain-e-Akbari and Dabestan-e Mazaheb.[13]

The Mughal Empire did not try to intervene in the local societies during most of its existence, but rather balanced and pacified them through new administrative practices[14][15] and diverse and inclusive ruling elites,[16] leading to more systematic, centralised, and uniform rule.[17] Traditional and newly coherent social groups in northern and western India, such as the Marathas, the Rajputs, the Pashtuns, the Hindu Jats and the Sikhs, gained military and governing ambitions during Mughal rule, which, through collaboration or adversity, gave them both recognition and military experience.[18][19][20][21]

The reign of Shah Jahan, the fifth emperor, between 1628 and 1658 was the golden age of Mughal architecture. He erected several large monuments, the best known of which is the Taj Mahal at Agra, as well as the Moti Masjid, Agra, the Red Fort, the Jama Masjid, Delhi, and the Lahore Fort. The Mughal Empire reached the zenith of its territorial expanse during the reign of Aurangzeb and also started its terminal decline in his reign due to Maratha military resurgence under Shivaji Bhosale. During his lifetime, victories in the south expanded the Mughal Empire to more than 3.2 million square kilometres (1.2 million square miles), ruling over more than 150 million subjects, nearly one quarter of the world's population at the time, with a combined GDP of over $90 billion.[22][23]

By the mid-18th century, the Marathas had routed Mughal armies and won over several Mughal provinces from the Punjab to Bengal.[24] Internal dissatisfaction arose due to the weakness of the empire's administrative and economic systems, leading to its break-up and declarations of independence of its former provinces by the Nawab of Bengal, the Nawab of Awadh, the Nizam of Hyderabad and other small states. In 1739, the Mughals were crushingly defeated in the Battle of Karnal by the forces of Nader Shah, the founder of the Afsharid dynasty in Persia, and Delhi was sacked and looted, drastically accelerating their decline. During the following century Mughal power had become severely limited, and the last emperor, Bahadur Shah II, had authority over only the city of Shahjahanabad. He issued a firman supporting the Indian Rebellion of 1857 and following the defeat was therefore tried by the British East India Company for treason, imprisoned and exiled to Rangoon.[25] The last remnants of the empire were formally taken over by the British, and the Government of India Act 1858 let the British Crown formally assume direct control of India in the form of the new British Raj.

Maratha, Sikh and KebabsEdit

The Maratha Empire or the Maratha Confederacy was an Indian power that existed from 1674 to 1818 and ruled over much of the Indian sub-continent. The Marathas are credited to a large extent for ending the Mughal rule in India.[3][4][5]

The Marathas are the Hindu knight group from the western Deccan Plateau (present day Maharashtra) that rose to prominence by establishing a Hindavi Swarajya. The Marathas became prominent in the 17th century under the leadership of Shivaji who revolted against the Adil Shahi dynasty and the Mughal Empire and carved out a rebel territory with Raigad as his capital. Known for their mobility, the Marathas were able to consolidate their territory during the Mughal–Maratha Wars and later controlled a large part of India.

Chhattrapati Shahu, a grandson of Shivaji, was released by the Mughals after the death of Emperor Aurangzeb. Following a brief struggle with his aunt Tarabai, Shahu became ruler and appointed Balaji Vishwanath, and later, his descendants, as the peshwas or prime ministers of the empire.[6] Balaji and his descendants played a key role in expansion of Maratha rule. The empire at its peak stretched from Tamil Nadu[7] in the south, to Peshawar (modern-day Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan[8] [a]) in the north, and Bengal and Andaman Islands in the east.[10] In 1761, the Maratha Army lost the Third Battle of Panipat to Ahmad Shah Abdali of the Afghan Durrani Empire which halted their imperial expansion into Afghanistan. Ten years after Panipat, the young Peshwa Madhavrao I's Maratha Resurrection reinstated Maratha authority over North India.

In a bid to effectively manage the large empire, he gave semi-autonomy to the strongest of the knights, which created a confederacy of Maratha states. They became known as the Gaekwads of Baroda, the Holkars of Indore and Malwa, the Scindias of Gwalior and Ujjain, the Bhonsales of the Nagpur and the Puars of Dhar and Dewas. In 1775, the East India Company intervened in a Peshwa family succession struggle in Pune, which became the First Anglo-Maratha War. The Marathas remained the preeminent power in India until their defeat in the Second Anglo-Maratha War which left the East India Company in control of most of India.

A large portion of the Maratha empire was coastline, which had been secured by the potent Maratha Navy under commanders such as Kanhoji Angre. He was very successful at keeping foreign naval ships, particularly of the Portuguese and British, at bay.[11] Securing the coastal areas and building land-based fortifications were crucial aspects of the Maratha's defensive strategy and regional military history.

The Sikh Empire (also Sikh Khalsa Raj, Sarkar-i-Khalsa or Pañjab (Punjab) Empire), was a major power that originated on the Indian Subcontinent, which arose under the leadership of Maharaja Ranjit Singh who established a secular empire[3] basing it around the Punjab. The empire existed from 1799, when Ranjit Singh captured Lahore, to 1849 and was forged on the foundations of the Khalsa from a collection of autonomous Sikh misls.[4][5] At its peak in the 19th century, the Empire extended from the Khyber Pass in the west to western Tibet in the east, and from Mithankot in the south to Kashmir in the north. It was the last major region of the subcontinent to be conquered by the British.

The foundations of the Sikh Empire can be traced to as early as 1707, the year of Aurangzeb's death and the start of the downfall of the Mughal Empire. With the Mughals significantly weakened, the Sikh army, known as the Dal Khalsa, a rearrangement of the Khalsa inaugurated by Guru Gobind Singh, led expeditions against them and the Afghans in the west. This led to a growth of the army which split into different confederacies or semi-independent misls. Each of these component armies controlled different areas and cities. However, in the period from 1762 to 1799, Sikh commanders of the misls appeared to be coming into their own as independent warlords.

The formation of the empire began with the capture of Lahore, by Ranjit Singh, from its Afghan ruler, Zaman Shah Durrani, and the subsequent and progressive expulsion of Afghans from the Punjab, by defeating them in the Afghan-Sikh Wars, and the unification of the separate Sikh misls. Ranjit Singh was proclaimed as Maharaja of the Punjab on 12 April 1801 (to coincide with Vaisakhi), creating a unified political state. Sahib Singh Bedi, a descendant of Guru Nanak, conducted the coronation.[6] Ranjit Singh rose to power in a very short period, from a leader of a single misl to finally becoming the Maharaja of Punjab. He began to modernise his army, using the latest training as well as weapons and artillery. After the death of Ranjit Singh, the empire was weakened by internal divisions and political mismanagement. Finally, by 1849 the state was dissolved after the defeat in the Anglo-Sikh wars.

The Sikh Empire was divided into four provinces: Lahore, in Punjab, which became the Sikh capital, Multan, also in Punjab, Peshawar and Kashmir from 1799 to 1849

East India Company and British RajEdit

The East India Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India Company and informally as John Company,[1] was an English and later British joint-stock company,[2] which was formed to pursue trade with the East Indies but ended up trading mainly with the Indian subcontinent and Qing China.

Originally chartered as the "Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading into the East Indies", the company rose to account for half of the world's trade, particularly in basic commodities including cotton, silk, indigo dye, salt, saltpetre, tea and opium. The company also ruled the beginnings of the British Empire in India.[3]

The company received a Royal Charter from Queen Elizabeth I on 31 December 1600,[4] making it the oldest among several similarly formed European East India Companies. Wealthy merchants and aristocrats owned the Company's shares.[5] The government owned no shares and had only indirect control.

The company eventually came to rule large areas of India with its own private armies, exercising military power and assuming administrative functions.[6] Company rule in India effectively began in 1757 after the Battle of Plassey and lasted until 1858 when, following the Indian Rebellion of 1857, the Government of India Act 1858 led to the British Crown assuming direct control of India in the form of the new British Raj.

Despite frequent government intervention, the company had recurring problems with its finances. It was dissolved in 1874 as a result of the East India Stock Dividend Redemption Act passed one year earlier, as the Government of India Act had by then rendered it vestigial, powerless, and obsolete. The official government machinery of British India had assumed its governmental functions and absorbed its armies. The British Raj (/rɑːdʒ/; from rāj, literally, "rule" in Hindustani)[2] was the rule of the British Crown in the Indian subcontinent between 1858 and 1947.[3][4][5][6] The rule is also called Crown rule in India,[7] or direct rule in India.[8] The region under British control was commonly called India in contemporaneous usage, and included areas directly administered by the United Kingdom, which were collectively called British India, and those ruled by indigenous rulers, but under British tutelage or paramountcy, and called the princely states. The resulting political union was also called the Indian Empire and after 1876 issued passports under that name.[9][10] As India, it was a founding member of the League of Nations, a participating nation in the Summer Olympics in 1900, 1920, 1928, 1932, and 1936, and a founding member of the United Nations in San Francisco in 1945.[11]

This system of governance was instituted on 28 June 1858, when, after the Indian Rebellion of 1857, the rule of the British East India Company was transferred to the Crown in the person of Queen Victoria[12] (who, in 1876, was proclaimed Empress of India). As a state, the British Empire in India functioned as if it saw itself as the guardian of a system of connected markets maintained by means of military power, business legislation and monetary management.[13] It lasted until 1947, when the British Indian Empire was partitioned into two sovereign dominion states: the Dominion of India (later the Republic of India) and the Dominion of Pakistan (later the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, the eastern part of which, still later, became the People's Republic of Bangladesh). At the inception of the Raj in 1858, Lower Burma was already a part of British India; Upper Burma was added in 1886, and the resulting union, Burma, was administered as an autonomous province until 1937, when it became a separate British colony, gaining its own independence in 1948. So by 1798, UKball had most of India in his hands. By 1803, his son East India Companyball ran most of India for him, capturing Nepal-icon NepalRawr in 1816, until 1857, when his newly renamed son British Indiaball (aka British Rajball) rebelled and murdered his father. As a result, UKball personally administered him and forcibly adopted him the following year. Indiaball became UKball's favourite adoptive son in 1876.

In 1914, Indiaball helped his adoptive father UKball in the Great War against ReichTime Reichtangle. In the 1920s, Indiaball developed a sense of nationalism, and was given a greater degree of autonomy and self-governance. But he still campaigned for independence in 1930 by marching to the coast and collecting salt (which was against the law). Indiaball helped his adoptive father again in 1940, against Nazi Germanyball, with the promise of eventual independence.British Burma-icon Burmaball. Indiaball also partly joined the Axis as Azadhindball and fought alongside Japanese imperial forces and was recognized by all the major Axis powers such as Germany, Italy and few other Asian nations.

In 1947, Indiaball got its independence from cruel adaptive father UKball. But Indiaball's brother Pakistan-icon Pakistanball was a Islam-icon kebab, and separated from Indiaball on that basis in 1948. They fought over custody of Jammuball and Kashmirball in 1962, where Chinaball was partially involved. Portugalball and Franceball gave Indiaball's cousins back in the 1960s. Indiaball's other brother Bangladesh-icon East Pakistanball followed Pakistanball in the 1971, and changed his name to Bangladeshball.

Twenty first Century IndiaballEdit

Today, Indiaball is on good terms with every country balls, except Pakistan-icon China-icon. He has a rapidly growing economy, 4th stronkest military and Nukes. He is 3rd stronkest by PPP and will overtake USA-icon by 2050. He spends his free time providing tech support, sailing the Indian Ocean and going to space.

Personality Edit

Indiaball hates all his land neighbours in the North (except NepalRawr and Bhutan-icon Bhutanball), specially Pakistanball and China-icon Chinaball. 1962 NEVER FORGET! as India considered it as brother (common saying Hindi-Chini bhai bhai)! He is a regional power and Asia's second strongest country after Chinaball. He gives donations to Bangladeshball, Nepalball, Maldivesball and also sometimes military support in his free time. He is also fed up with separatists in some parts of his clay, mostly in the north-east. But most of the time he will be your friend and likes to help and is happy that he is able into space and the fastest growing economy in the world. He sucks at sports, except for cricket, hockey and kabaddi where he kicks everyone's ass. He have plans to build Great Indian galactic empire a colony on Mars (take that, UKball!). He wants to be a Superpower by 2030 and get more monies.

Relationships Edit

Friends

  • Russia-icon Russiaball - Gibs tons of weapons. Fellow BRICS member. Can into removing kebab. Will help your economy and buy more weapons. DEFEND VODKA!
  • USA-icon USAball - Stop shooting our people you little insecure motherfucker. We are not Middle Eastern. He says he's my friend but gibs weapons and monies to that paki scumbag. Lot of Indiaballs in his clay as engineers and scientists. Will take away all your american jobs!
  • UK-icon UKball - Adoptive father. Was of tyranny. Tea addict. How dare you kill my people Never forget Jalliawala Bagh! Gib Koh-i-noor back!! Has Lots of Indiaballs in his clay. Will Colonise you and your war loving son from inside! I'll make you proud!
  • Afghan-icon Afghanistanball - My Hitman Old friend who got raped by USA-icon USAball. I gib lots of aid, dams, helicopters and train his soldiers so that he can stab paki if needed as a sign of goodwill.
  • UAE-icon UAEball - Trade Partner - He is of 40% India-icon curry. Best kabab in Arabia.
  • Saudi Arabia-icon Saudi Arabiaball - Old trading partner, but can be a bit scary. He's nice, unless you steal or insult the royal family.
  • Bangladesh-icon Bangladeshball -I freed him from evil Pakistan in 1971.
  • Japan-icon Japanball - Great technology. Can into monies. Gibs bullet trains and anime. DEFEND ANIME!
  • Armenia-icon Armeniaball -Hates Pakistan for not recognizing him. Anyone who hates Pakistan is my friend.
  • Israel-icon Israelcube - Gibs weapon technology. I will help you against evil kebab neighbors. He also hates Pakistan. We share same problems. Many Jewish Indiaball are Israeli citizens.
  • Palestine-icon Palestineball- Look, I want to help yuo. I know that yuo are oppressed. But I need Israel's hi-tech equipment. Just take the aid and be happy.
  • Nepal-icon NepalRawr - Hindu like I am. But he can be savage at times, his soldiers are very badass. My 30th state!
  • Vietnam-icon Vietnamball - Array against China. Will gib him missiles.
  • Yugoslavia-icon Yugoslaviaball - Non aligned friends.Come back plox I miss you.We are both founding members of the non-alligned movement.

Enemies

  • Pakistan-icon Pakistanball- Remob terrorist kebab! Every particle of yuor clay is mine!
  • China-icon Chinaball (Frenemy) - Evil Commie! How dare you support Pakistan?! 1962 worst year of life. But can into BRICS. I will join SCO in '17.
  • Niger-icon Nigerball - Flag stealer
  • Gypsy-icon Gypsyball - Disgrace
  • Portugal-icon Portugalball - Goa is of my clay. End of story.
  • Somalia-icon Somaliaball - Stop stealing my ships! Bloody pirate!! And stop bullying my fishermen! My navy is not for show!
  • ISIS-icon ISISball - Are yuo of ISI by any chance? Because ya know, ISI+S= ISIS
  • Sentinelese-icon Sentineleseball (kind of) - Stop throwing spears and killing our Fishermen even when we try to send aid, but I guess, we will leave you alone.

GalleryEdit

LinksEdit


VTE
India-icon Curry Republic of India India-icon
Administrative divisions Andhra Pradesh-icon Andhra PradeshballArunachal Pradesh-icon Arunachal PradeshballAssam-icon AssamballBihar-icon BiharballChhattisgarh-icon ChhattisgarhballGoa-icon GoaballGujarat-icon GujaratballHaryana-icon HaryanaballHimachal Pradesh-icon Himachal PradeshballKashmir-icon Jammu and KashmirballJharkhand-icon JharkhandballKarnataka-icon KarnatakaballKerala-icon KeralaballMadhya Pradesh-icon Madhya PradeshballMaharashtra-icon MaharashtraballManipur-icon ManipurballMeghalaya-icon MeghalayaballMizoram-icon MizoramballNagaland-icon NagalandballOdisha-icon OdishaballPunjab-icon PunjabballRajasthan-icon RajasthanballSikkim-icon SikkimballTamil Nadu-icon Tamil NaduballTelangana-icon TelanganaballTripura-icon TripuraballUttar Pradesh-icon Uttar PradeshballUttarakhand-icon UttarakhandballWest Bengal-icon West Bengalball

Union territories India-icon (division) Andaman and Nicobar IslandsballIndia-icon (division) ChandigarhballIndia-icon (division) Dadra and Nagar HaveliballIndia-icon (division) Daman and DiuballIndia-icon (division) LakshadweepballIndia-icon (division) National Capital Territory of DelhiballIndia-icon (division) Puducherryball
Historical entities 2-icon Prehistoric Hindustan2-icon (division) Magadhaball2-icon (division) Mahajanapadaball2-icon (division) Haryankaball2-icon (division) Shishunagaball2-icon (division) Nandaball2-icon (division) MauryaballMughal-icon MughalballMaratha-icon MarathasaurBritish Raj-icon British Rajball
VTE
Earth-icon Modern countries and dependencies of Polandball Poland-icon
Caveballs 1-icon 1ball2-icon 2ball3-icon 3ball4-icon 4ball5-icon 5ball (Australian Aborigines-icon Australian aboriginalsball) • 6-icon 6ball7-icon 7ball (Maori-icon Maoriball) • 8-icon 8ball
3-icon Americas Anguilla-icon AnguillaballAntigua-icon Antigua and BarbudaballArgentina-icon ArgentinaballAruba-icon ArubaballBahamas-icon BahamasballBarbados-icon BarbadosballBelize-icon BelizeballBermuda-icon BermudatriangleBolivia-icon BoliviaballBonaire-icon BonaireballBrazil-icon BrazilballBritish Virgin Islands-icon British Virgin IslandsballCalifornia-icon CaliforniaballCanada-icon CanadaballCayman Islands-icon Cayman IslandballChile-icon ChileballColombia-icon ColombiaballCosta Rica-icon Costa RicaballCuba-icon CubaballCuracao-icon CuracaoballDominica-icon DominicaballDominican-icon Dominican RepublicballEcuador-icon EcuadorballEl Salvador-icon El SalvadorballFrench Guyana-icon French GuianaballGreenland-icon GreenlandballGrenada-icon GrenadaballGuadeloupe-icon GuadeloupeballGuatemala-icon GuatemalaballGuyana-icon GuyanaballHaiti-icon HaitiballHonduras-icon HondurasballJamaica-icon JamaicaballFalklands-icon FalklandsballMartinique-icon MartiniqueballMexico-icon MexicoballMontserrat-icon MontserratballNicaragua-icon NicaraguaballPanama-icon PanamaballParaguay-icon ParaguayballPeru-icon PeruballPuertoRico-icon Puerto RicoballSaba-icon SababallSaint Barthélemy-icon Saint-BarthélemyballLucia-icon Saint LuciaballSaint Pierre and Miquelon-icon Saint Pierre and MiquelonballVincent-icon Saint Vincent and the GrenadinesballKitts-icon St. Kitts and NevisballSint Eustatius-icon Sint EustatiusballSint Maarten-icon Sint MaartenballSuriname-icon SurinameballTrinidad-icon Trinidad and TobagoballTurks and Caicos-icon Turks and CaicosballUSA-icon USAballVirginIslands-icon Virgin IslandsballUruguay-icon UruguayballVenezuela-icon Venezuelaball
2-icon Europe Abkhazia-icon AbkhaziaballAlbania-icon AlbaniaballAndorra-icon AndorraballArmenia-icon ArmeniaballAustria-icon AustriaballAzerbaijan-icon AzerbaijanballBelarus-icon BelarusballBelgium-icon BelgiumballBosnia-icon BosniaballBulgaria-icon BulgariaballCroatia-icon CroatiaballCyprus-icon CyprusballCzech-icon CzechballDenmark-icon DenmarkballEstonia-icon EstoniaballFaroe-icon Faroe IslandsballFinland-icon FinlandballFrance-icon FranceballGeorgia-icon GeorgiaballGermany-icon Germanyball (ReichTime Reichtangle) • Gibraltar-icon GibraltarballGreece-icon GreeceballGuernsey-icon GuernseyballGypsy-icon GypsyballHungary-icon HungaryballIceland-icon IcelandballIreland-icon IrelandballIsle of Man-icon Isle of ManballItaly-icon ItalyballJersey-icon JerseyballKosovo-icon KosovoballLatvia-icon LatviaballLiberland-icon LiberlandballLiechtenstein-icon LiechtensteinballLithuania-icon LithuaniaballLuxembourg-icon LuxembourgballMacedonia-icon MacedoniaballMalta-icon MaltaballMoldova-icon MoldovaballMonaco-icon MonacoballMontenegro-icon MontenegroballNagorno-Karabakh-icon Nagorno-KarabakhballNovorossiya (seperatist)-icon Novorossiyaball Novorossiya-icon (Donetsk-Republic-icon DonetskballLuhansk-Republic-icon Luganskball) • Netherlands-icon NetherlandsballNorway-icon NorwayballPoland-icon PolandballPortugal-icon PortugalballRomania-icon RomaniaballRussia-icon Russiaball (Crimea-icon Crimeaball) • San Marino-icon San MarinoballSealand-icon SealandballSerbia-icon SerbiaballSlovakia-icon SlovakiaballTransnistria-icon TransnistriaballSlovenia-icon SloveniaballSouth Ossetia-icon South OssetiaballSpain-icon SpainballSweden-icon SwedenballSwitzerland-icon SwitzerlandballTurkey-icon TurkeyballUkraine-icon UkraineballUK-icon UKball (England-icon EnglandballNorthern Ireland-icon Northern IrelandballScotland-icon ScotlandballWales-icon Walesball) • Vatican-icon Vaticanball
8-icon Africa Algeria-icon AlgeriaballAngola-icon AngolaballBenin-icon BeninballBotswana-icon BotswanaballBurkina Faso-icon Burkina FasoballBurundi-icon BurundiballCameroon-icon CameroonballCape Verde-icon Cape VerdeballCAR-icon Central African RepublicballChad-icon ChadballComoros-icon ComorosballCongo-icon CongoballDR Congo-icon DR CongoballDjibouti-icon DjiboutiballEgypt-icon EgyptballEquatorial Guinea-icon Equatorial GuineaballEritrea-icon EritreaballEthiopia-icon EthiopiaballGabon-icon GabonballGambia-icon GambiaballGhana-icon GhanaballGuinea-icon GuineaballGuinea-Bissau-icon Guinea-BissauballIvory Coast-icon Ivory CoastballKenya-icon KenyaballLesotho-icon LesothoballLiberia-icon LiberiaballLibya-icon LibyaballMadagascar-icon MadagascarballMalawi-icon MalawiballMali-icon MaliballMauritania-icon MauritaniaballMauritius-icon MauritiusballMayotte-icon MayotteballMorocco-icon MoroccoballMozambique-icon MozambiqueballNamibia-icon NamibiaballNiger-icon NigerballNigeria-icon NigeriaballRéunion-icon RéunionballRwanda-icon RwandaballSão Tomé and Príncipe-icon São Tomé and PríncipeballSenegal-icon SenegalballSeychelles-icon SeychellesballSierra Leone-icon Sierra LeoneballSomalia-icon Somaliaball (Somaliland-icon SomalilandballPuntland-icon Puntlandball) • South Africa-icon South AfricaballSouth Sudan-icon South SudanballSudan-icon SudanballSwaziland-icon SwazilandballTanzania-icon TanzaniaballTogo-icon TogoballTunisia-icon TunisiaballUganda-icon UgandaballWestern Sahara-icon Western SaharaballZambia-icon ZambiaballZimbabwe-icon Zimbabweball
1-icon Asia Afghan-icon AfghanistanballBangladesh-icon BangladeshballBhutan-icon BhutanballBritish Indian Ocean Territory-icon British Indian Ocean TerritoryballBrunei-icon BruneiballMyanmar-icon BurmaballCambodia-icon CambodiaballChina-icon Chinaball (Hong Kong-icon Hong KongballMacau-icon MacauballTibet-icon TibetballUyghur-icon Uyghurball) • East Timor-icon East TimorballIndia-icon IndiaballIndonesia-icon IndonesiaballJapan-icon Japanball (Okinawa-icon Okinawaball) • Kazakhstan-icon KazakhbrickNorth Korea-icon North KoreaballSouth Korea-icon South KoreaballKyrgyz-icon KyrgyzstanballLaos-icon LaosballMalaysia-icon MalaysiaballMaldives-icon MaldivesballMongolia-icon MongoliaballNepal-icon NepalRawrPakistan-icon PakistanballPhilippines-icon PhilippinesballRussia-icon Russiaball (Siberia-icon SiberiaballWinged Doom-icon Omsk bird) • Sri Lanka-icon Sri LankaballTaiwan-icon Taiwanball (Chinese-Taipei-icon Chinese Taipeiball) • Tajik-icon TajikistanballThailand-icon ThailandballSingapore-icon TringaporeTurkmen-icon TurkmenistanballUzbek-icon UzbekballVietnam-icon Vietnamball
Middle-east-4ball-icon Middle East Bahrain-icon BahrainballCyprus-icon CyprusballEgypt-icon EgyptballIran-icon IranballIraq-icon IraqballIsrael-icon Israelcube (Palestine-icon Palestineball) • Jordan-icon JordanballKurdistan-icon KurdistanballKuwait-icon KuwaitballLebanon-icon LebanonballNorthern Cyprus-icon Northern CyprusballOman-icon OmanballQatar-icon QatarballSaudi Arabia-icon Saudi ArabiaballSyria-icon SyriaballTurkey-icon TurkeyballUAE-icon UAEballYemen-icon Yemenball
7-icon Oceania Australia-icon Australiaball (Christmas Island-icon Christmas IslandballCocos Islands-icon CocosballNorfolk Island-icon Norfolk Islandball) • Fiji-icon FijiballFrench Polynesia-icon French PolynesiaballGuam-icon GuamballKiribati-icon KiribatiballMarshall Islands-icon Marshall IslandsballMicronesia-icon MicronesiaballNauru-icon NauruballNew Caledonia-icon New CaledoniaballNew Zealand-icon New Zealandball (Cook Islands-icon Cook IslandsballNiue-icon Niueball) • Northern Mariana Islands-icon Northern Mariana IslandsballPalau-icon PalauballPapua New Guinea-icon Papua New GuineaballPitcairn Islands-icon Pitcairn IslandsballSamoa-icon SamoaballSolomon Islands-icon Solomon IslandsballTokelau-icon TokelauballTonga-icon TongaballTuvalu-icon TuvaluballVanuatu-icon VanuatuballWallis and Futuna-icon Wallis and Futunaball
Others Antarctica-icon AntarcticaballGypsy-icon GypsyballIlluminati-iconTrilluminatiAtlantis-icon Atlantisball
Terms in italics are unrecognized and partially recognized states

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